Get this from a library! Ritusamhara: or, The pageant of the seasons. [Kālidāsa.; Ranjit Sitaram Pandit]. Ritusamhara Or The Pageant Of The Seasons. by: Pandit R.s.. Publication date: eBooks and Texts. Bharat Ek Khoj. Uploaded by Public. enbillitaco.gq: The Ritusamhara Of Kalidasa enbillitaco.gq: Print - Paper enbillitaco.gq: Book IN COLLECTIONS. Public Library of India. eBooks and Texts.

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    Ritusamhara: or, The pageant of the seasons. Front Cover. Kālidāsa, Ranjit Sitaram Pandit. National Information & Publications, - 95 pages. 0 Reviews . The Ritusamhara of Kalidasa: a new translation of the Sanskrit classic. Front Cover. K̄alid̄asa. Dialogue Calcutta Publications, - 19 pages. 0 Reviews . Advanced Book Search · Get print book. No eBook available Ritusamhara: or , The pageant of the seasons · Kālidāsa,Ranjit Sitaram Pandit Snippet view -.

    In spite of the celebrity of his name, the time when he flourished always has been an unsettled question, although most scholars nowadays favor the middle of the 4th and early 5th centuries A. Numerous works have been attributed to his authorship. Only seven are generally considered genuine. The main logics, ecidences are as follows: 1. Flaw: Y. Max Muller basing on this said that Kalidasa was in the court of this Vikram. SO, Kalidasa was in 6th AD onwards. This is his upper bound. Banabhatta in the preface of his Kadambari mentions Kalidasa. Banabhatta was in early 7th century AD. Some call him native of Kashmir, some of Vidarbh, some of Bengal and others of Ujjain. It is said that he was a dumb fool to start with. Anyone who gets defeated will be black faced, head shaven and kicked out of country on a donkey. The punishment part might be later aditions!

    He was killed by a courtesan once when he visited his friend in Ceylon. Courtesy: Shashikanth Joshi Works of Kalidasa: Plays — There are three plays, the earliest of which is probably the Malavikaagnimitra Malavikaa and Agnimitra , a work concerned with palace intrigue. It is of special interest because the hero is a historical figure, King Agnimitra, whose father, Pushhpamitra, wrested the kingship of northern India from the Mauryan king Brihadratha about B.

    The Vikramorvashiiya Urvashii Won Through Valor is based on the old legend of the love of the mortal Pururavaas for the heavenly damsel Urvashii. The legend occurs in embryonic form in a hymn of the Rig Veda and in a much amplified version in the ShatapathabraahmaNa.

    The third play, AbhiGYaanashaakuntala Shakuntalaa Recognized by the Token Ring , is the work by which Kaalidaasa is best known not only in India but throughout the world. It was the first work of Kaalidaasa to be translated into English from which was made a German translation in that evoked the often quoted admiration by Goethe.

    In bare outline the story of the play is as follows: King Dushhyanta, while on a hunting expedition, meets the hermit-girl Shakuntalaa, whom he marries in the hermitage by a ceremony of mutual consent. Obliged by affairs of state to return to his palace, he gives Shakuntalaa his signet ring, promising to send for her later. But when Shakuntalaa comes to the court for their reunion, pregnant with his child, Dushhyanta fails to acknowledge her as his wife because of a curse.

    The spell is subsequently broken by the discovery of the ring, which Shakuntalaa had lost on her way to the court. The couple are later reunited, and all ends happily.

    The Ritusamhara Of Kalidasa

    The influence of the AbhiGYaanashaakuntala outside India is evident not only in the abundance of translations in many languages, but also in its adaptation to the operatic stage by Paderewski, Weinggartner, and Alfano. The former is concerned with the events that lead to the marriage of the god Shiva and Paarvatii, daughter of the Himalayas.

    This union was desired by the gods for the production of a son, Kumara, god of war, who would help them defeat the demon Taraka. The gods induce Kama, god of love, to discharge an amatory arrow at Siva who is engrossed in meditation. Angered by this interruption of his austerities, he burns Kama to ashes with a glance of his third eye. But love for Paarvatii has been aroused, and it culminates in their marriage. The Raghuvamsha treats of the family to which the great hero Rama belonged, commencing with its earliest antecedents and encapsulating the principal events told in the Raamaayana of Valmiki.

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    But like the Kumarasambhava, the last nine cantos of which are clearly the addition of another poet, the Raghuvamsha ends rather abruptly, suggesting either that it was left unfinished by the poet or that its final portion was lost early. The latter, if at all a genuine work of Kalidasa, must surely be regarded as a youthful composition, as it is distinguished by rather exaggerated and overly exuberant depictions of nature, such as are not elsewhere typical of the poet.

    It is of tangential interest, however, that the Ritusamhara, published in Bengal in , was the first book to be printed in Sanskrit. A short poem of stanzas, it is founded at once upon the barest and yet most original of plots.

    For some unexplained dereliction of duty, a Yaksha, or attendant of Kubera, god of wealth, has been sent by his lord into yearlong exile in the mountains of central India, far away from his beloved wife on Mount Kaildasa in the Himalayas. At the opening of the poem, particularly distraught and hapless at the onset of the rains when the sky is dark and gloomy with clouds, the yaksa opens his heart to a cloud hugging close the mountain top.

    He thot she will poke his one eye, so he showed her two fingers. She showed her the palm with fingers extended like in a slap. He showed her the fist.

    She accepted it as answer to her question. So she kicks him out of the house. Kali was appeased with him and granted him profound wisdom. He was killed by a courtesan once when he visited his friend in Ceylon. Courtesy: Shashikanth Joshi Works of Kalidasa: Plays — There are three plays, the earliest of which is probably the Malavikaagnimitra Malavikaa and Agnimitra , a work concerned with palace intrigue.

    It is of special interest because the hero is a historical figure, King Agnimitra, whose father, Pushhpamitra, wrested the kingship of northern India from the Mauryan king Brihadratha about B. The Vikramorvashiiya Urvashii Won Through Valor is based on the old legend of the love of the mortal Pururavaas for the heavenly damsel Urvashii.

    The legend occurs in embryonic form in a hymn of the Rig Veda and in a much amplified version in the ShatapathabraahmaNa. The third play, AbhiGYaanashaakuntala Shakuntalaa Recognized by the Token Ring , is the work by which Kaalidaasa is best known not only in India but throughout the world. It was the first work of Kaalidaasa to be translated into English from which was made a German translation in that evoked the often quoted admiration by Goethe.

    GK Quiz on Ancient History

    In bare outline the story of the play is as follows: King Dushhyanta, while on a hunting expedition, meets the hermit-girl Shakuntalaa, whom he marries in the hermitage by a ceremony of mutual consent.

    Obliged by affairs of state to return to his palace, he gives Shakuntalaa his signet ring, promising to send for her later. But when Shakuntalaa comes to the court for their reunion, pregnant with his child, Dushhyanta fails to acknowledge her as his wife because of a curse. The spell is subsequently broken by the discovery of the ring, which Shakuntalaa had lost on her way to the court.

    The couple are later reunited, and all ends happily. The influence of the AbhiGYaanashaakuntala outside India is evident not only in the abundance of translations in many languages, but also in its adaptation to the operatic stage by Paderewski, Weinggartner, and Alfano. The former is concerned with the events that lead to the marriage of the god Shiva and Paarvatii, daughter of the Himalayas. This union was desired by the gods for the production of a son, Kumara, god of war, who would help them defeat the demon Taraka.

    The gods induce Kama, god of love, to discharge an amatory arrow at Siva who is engrossed in meditation. Angered by this interruption of his austerities, he burns Kama to ashes with a glance of his third eye. But love for Paarvatii has been aroused, and it culminates in their marriage. The Raghuvamsha treats of the family to which the great hero Rama belonged, commencing with its earliest antecedents and encapsulating the principal events told in the Raamaayana of Valmiki.

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